Rate the last movie you've seen

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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#161

Post by G-Man » Fri Aug 25, 2017 5:21 pm

Ricochet wrote:
Fri Aug 25, 2017 4:57 pm
G-Man wrote:
Mon Aug 21, 2017 7:13 pm
I'll drop this here just for Rico:

Fifty Shades Darker? More like fifty shades less plot development.
Why for me? I skipped past all the, ahem, plot development, anyway. :grin:
Because you griped about me not sharing my thoughts on movies I've been watching in Discord last week.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#162

Post by Ricochet » Fri Aug 25, 2017 5:46 pm

Was gonna rant about the Netflix Death Note, but then I suddenly found no energy whatsoever to pursue this in serious fashion. D for dumb. Not a travesty, still dumb.

...

Actually, I changed my mind. Get mildly spoiled below only if you've seen it or do not care about seeing it (which is the better mindset of the two, fwiw).
Spoiler: show
"Remember the cat 'n' mouse chase and mindgames between L and Light in the anime? The twisted elements of bonding and playing each other? The, all hyperbolic characterisation aside, chess play between two hyper-intelligent minds? Well let's have none of that. None. In fact, let's have this Light make so blatant of a wrong, thoughtless, impulsive move within his first two kills, after the which the movie should continue for another hour simply because L doesn't go deep enough (or, y'kno, actually smart enough) to figure it out."

Every throwback to the anime is just treated like a meme. Remember apples, people? Remember those apples? Well let's have Ryuk munch them off-screen, plus not even express delight at the taste of them. Remember squating and eating sweet, people? Well let's have L stuff himself with Haribos and squat on a chair, like, two times in the movie, and otherwise just let the actor act as spastic as he can improvise, plus act a zillion times more nervous and twitchy than L's whole composure and range throughout the entire anime.

The CGI on Ryuk is a complete joke. Somewhere stuck in midprocess between trying to animate a doll and going all murky grey dark to hide the imperfections of the CGI shitjob. Remember any moment in the anime where Ryuk was not shown in his glorious full detail? Me neither.

Watari is "Watari"'s real name in this movie. His. Real. Name. And he's called just Watari, a human being legally named just... Watari. Light writing his name in the DN literally works. Writing just Watari in the DN... literally... works*screeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaammmmm-*
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#163

Post by Ricochet » Fri Aug 25, 2017 5:47 pm

G-Man wrote:
Fri Aug 25, 2017 5:21 pm
Ricochet wrote:
Fri Aug 25, 2017 4:57 pm
G-Man wrote:
Mon Aug 21, 2017 7:13 pm
I'll drop this here just for Rico:

Fifty Shades Darker? More like fifty shades less plot development.
Why for me? I skipped past all the, ahem, plot development, anyway. :grin:
Because you griped about me not sharing my thoughts on movies I've been watching in Discord last week.
Ah. Well, that does remain a valid complaint.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#164

Post by Epignosis » Fri Aug 25, 2017 10:11 pm

Ricochet wrote:
Fri Aug 25, 2017 5:46 pm
Was gonna rant about the Netflix Death Note, but then I suddenly found no energy whatsoever to pursue this in serious fashion. D for dumb. Not a travesty, still dumb.

...

Actually, I changed my mind. Get mildly spoiled below only if you've seen it or do not care about seeing it (which is the better mindset of the two, fwiw).
Spoiler: show
"Remember the cat 'n' mouse chase and mindgames between L and Light in the anime? The twisted elements of bonding and playing each other? The, all hyperbolic characterisation aside, chess play between two hyper-intelligent minds? Well let's have none of that. None. In fact, let's have this Light make so blatant of a wrong, thoughtless, impulsive move within his first two kills, after the which the movie should continue for another hour simply because L doesn't go deep enough (or, y'kno, actually smart enough) to figure it out."

Every throwback to the anime is just treated like a meme. Remember apples, people? Remember those apples? Well let's have Ryuk munch them off-screen, plus not even express delight at the taste of them. Remember squating and eating sweet, people? Well let's have L stuff himself with Haribos and squat on a chair, like, two times in the movie, and otherwise just let the actor act as spastic as he can improvise, plus act a zillion times more nervous and twitchy than L's whole composure and range throughout the entire anime.

The CGI on Ryuk is a complete joke. Somewhere stuck in midprocess between trying to animate a doll and going all murky grey dark to hide the imperfections of the CGI shitjob. Remember any moment in the anime where Ryuk was not shown in his glorious full detail? Me neither.

Watari is "Watari"'s real name in this movie. His. Real. Name. And he's called just Watari, a human being legally named just... Watari. Light writing his name in the DN literally works. Writing just Watari in the DN... literally... works*screeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaammmmm-*
I have some thoughts. I'll get to them after I get SF2 Mafia rolling.

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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#165

Post by Epignosis » Sat Aug 26, 2017 1:37 am

Ricochet wrote:
Fri Aug 25, 2017 5:46 pm
Was gonna rant about the Netflix Death Note, but then I suddenly found no energy whatsoever to pursue this in serious fashion. D for dumb. Not a travesty, still dumb.

...

Actually, I changed my mind. Get mildly spoiled below only if you've seen it or do not care about seeing it (which is the better mindset of the two, fwiw).
Spoiler: show
"Remember the cat 'n' mouse chase and mindgames between L and Light in the anime? The twisted elements of bonding and playing each other? The, all hyperbolic characterisation aside, chess play between two hyper-intelligent minds? Well let's have none of that. None. In fact, let's have this Light make so blatant of a wrong, thoughtless, impulsive move within his first two kills, after the which the movie should continue for another hour simply because L doesn't go deep enough (or, y'kno, actually smart enough) to figure it out."

Every throwback to the anime is just treated like a meme. Remember apples, people? Remember those apples? Well let's have Ryuk munch them off-screen, plus not even express delight at the taste of them. Remember squating and eating sweet, people? Well let's have L stuff himself with Haribos and squat on a chair, like, two times in the movie, and otherwise just let the actor act as spastic as he can improvise, plus act a zillion times more nervous and twitchy than L's whole composure and range throughout the entire anime.

The CGI on Ryuk is a complete joke. Somewhere stuck in midprocess between trying to animate a doll and going all murky grey dark to hide the imperfections of the CGI shitjob. Remember any moment in the anime where Ryuk was not shown in his glorious full detail? Me neither.

Watari is "Watari"'s real name in this movie. His. Real. Name. And he's called just Watari, a human being legally named just... Watari. Light writing his name in the DN literally works. Writing just Watari in the DN... literally... works*screeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaammmmm-*
Spoiler: show
I believe with all my heart that people suffer from "The previous version is better than this one" sickness.

While I do believe the anime was superior to the Netflix film, I think the Netflix film did a lot of things right. For one, they showed Light as a self-centered KID. Yes, a kid who "makes so blatant of a wrong, thoughtless move within his first two kills." To me, that makes sense. He's a smart math kid, but stupid when it comes to the Death Note. That said, I liked his first few kills. They made sense within the framework of American culture.

I don't understand your complaints about apples or candy. How are they "treated like a meme?" How would you do them differently as a filmmaker? The apples and candy shots, in my opinion, were better than the anime. I don't need to see Ryuk sucking apple cores to get that he likes apples. This movie did it with fun and a nod. That's all you need.

The CGI on Ryuk was fine and I liked how he wasn't the center of attention with his "glorious full detail." This isn't a cartoon. He was also an asshole instead of a friendly character. I liked that too.

My disagreements end there.

I loved "Dr. Strange" from Gotham playing Watari, but I agree with Rico here: Watari isn't his real name, so what the hell?

Yes, this is inferior to the anime, but I believe if this movie had come out first, a lot of people would call the anime garbage. That's how we are a lot of the times. I felt this was a good movie with a few distinct weaknesses.

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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#166

Post by Ricochet » Sat Aug 26, 2017 3:41 am

Epignosis wrote:
Sat Aug 26, 2017 1:37 am
Ricochet wrote:
Fri Aug 25, 2017 5:46 pm
Was gonna rant about the Netflix Death Note, but then I suddenly found no energy whatsoever to pursue this in serious fashion. D for dumb. Not a travesty, still dumb.

...

Actually, I changed my mind. Get mildly spoiled below only if you've seen it or do not care about seeing it (which is the better mindset of the two, fwiw).
Spoiler: show
"Remember the cat 'n' mouse chase and mindgames between L and Light in the anime? The twisted elements of bonding and playing each other? The, all hyperbolic characterisation aside, chess play between two hyper-intelligent minds? Well let's have none of that. None. In fact, let's have this Light make so blatant of a wrong, thoughtless, impulsive move within his first two kills, after the which the movie should continue for another hour simply because L doesn't go deep enough (or, y'kno, actually smart enough) to figure it out."

Every throwback to the anime is just treated like a meme. Remember apples, people? Remember those apples? Well let's have Ryuk munch them off-screen, plus not even express delight at the taste of them. Remember squating and eating sweet, people? Well let's have L stuff himself with Haribos and squat on a chair, like, two times in the movie, and otherwise just let the actor act as spastic as he can improvise, plus act a zillion times more nervous and twitchy than L's whole composure and range throughout the entire anime.

The CGI on Ryuk is a complete joke. Somewhere stuck in midprocess between trying to animate a doll and going all murky grey dark to hide the imperfections of the CGI shitjob. Remember any moment in the anime where Ryuk was not shown in his glorious full detail? Me neither.

Watari is "Watari"'s real name in this movie. His. Real. Name. And he's called just Watari, a human being legally named just... Watari. Light writing his name in the DN literally works. Writing just Watari in the DN... literally... works*screeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaammmmm-*
Spoiler: show
I believe with all my heart that people suffer from "The previous version is better than this one" sickness.

While I do believe the anime was superior to the Netflix film, I think the Netflix film did a lot of things right. For one, they showed Light as a self-centered KID. Yes, a kid who "makes so blatant of a wrong, thoughtless move within his first two kills." To me, that makes sense. He's a smart math kid, but stupid when it comes to the Death Note. That said, I liked his first few kills. They made sense within the framework of American culture.

I don't understand your complaints about apples or candy. How are they "treated like a meme?" How would you do them differently as a filmmaker? The apples and candy shots, in my opinion, were better than the anime. I don't need to see Ryuk sucking apple cores to get that he likes apples. This movie did it with fun and a nod. That's all you need.

The CGI on Ryuk was fine and I liked how he wasn't the center of attention with his "glorious full detail." This isn't a cartoon. He was also an asshole instead of a friendly character. I liked that too.

My disagreements end there.

I loved "Dr. Strange" from Gotham playing Watari, but I agree with Rico here: Watari isn't his real name, so what the hell?

Yes, this is inferior to the anime, but I believe if this movie had come out first, a lot of people would call the anime garbage. That's how we are a lot of the times. I felt this was a good movie with a few distinct weaknesses.
Well that was me in simple fanboy rant mode more than pertinent criticism, but I can go more in depth, I suppose.
Spoiler: show

Well, I believe with all my heart that the American film industry suffers from the "let's crap out a movie (or adaptation) out of everything popular, with half-assed effort put into it" syndrome.

Among the things that I can mention to have actually liked would me Mia. Faint praise in the overall context, but I feel she struck the right note of crazy-eyed, psychotic, overly attached and yet even potentially duplicitous character. Plus, while I'm sure the actress was overall selected for her natural mix (at least from the previous shows I've seen her in) of cheerleader looks, sass and sarcasm, the other stuff wasn't quite in her usual range, so that's already someone who visibly went into her character.

The other thing would probably be the gore. Not something the anime had full liberty to do, up to a point, but here at least it had a splashy, trashy, Final Destination-like quality. I'm convinced the budget went more into the blood splatters, while the Ryuk one stopped at making him look like a Gremlin.

"Self-centered" is a fairly weak descriptor to want or applaud for being achieved, because to an extent, absolutely every main character in this story is "self-centered". One big theme proposed by Death Note is that there is less heroism to talk about and more what means people will take to have it their way on the grand chessboard of life and morality; that there is no big-lettered one Justice, only justice seen through the eyes of many, who want to impose it as the right one.

Digression-aside, while I understand that Yagami Light is a Japanese anime version of a "genius kid developing a God complex", an avatar that tests plausibility plenty of times, Light Turner is just... idk, geek emo? I think Light Turner being "stupid when it comes to the Death Note" is deeply problematic instead of anything close to satisfying. Why would anyone want a Light who's bad at using the Death Note?! At a basic level, Yagami Light being competent, skillful, intelligent and focused with his actions surrounding the Death Note should be a desirable element of the show. I do not for a second believe that the expectation for this movie from any Death Note fan should be for Light to do something that could, under normal circumstances, lead back to him in two-three moves. Yagami Light being tested and put under great pressure time and again was immense fun in the anime. Light Turner having his dad come up to him after it's time for the movie to end and say "hey kid I just realized you went through my stuff to get your mother's murderer killed under strange, comical circumstances"? Ech.

I can also agree in principle with what you've said about part of the narrative fitting the American cultural frame, but I think that's also a problem in itself. Yagami Light required no major premise to set the events in motion. For all we know, he was a prodigious student and handsome, popular kid in the public eye that nevertheless felt empty, lonely and... "bored" inside. Roll things from there. I think the "American" mindset took that last part and developed it into "oh, Light Turner has to be a high-school loner, doesn't he? There just has to be a bully somewhere to fuel his rage, doesn't it? We just have to make him a half-orphan, to establish clear motive for one of his early kills, right?". Ech.

By "treating things like a meme", I meant treating any clear throwback or token from the lore as just that. "Showing the lightsaber just because." There is no real depth in showing an apple being snatched somewhere from darkness and then spit out half-chomped, only evasiveness (perhaps from technical shortcomings, which I believe in since I find Ryuk's aspect to be so half-assed) and shallowness in style. It's like that "jump scares in horrors need to come from seconds of silence and uncertainty, followed by a loud bang and jump" trope used 99% of times. Ryuk eating apples meant, in itself, nothing. Ryuk loving apples meant a lot. This is used in the movie with about as much depth as you having posted an image of apples and then a sketch of Ryuk in the Birthday thread.

Furthermore, my point was not about Ryuk being center of attention, but of there being no need to mask, blur his appearance or use the shallow "spooky" method in portraying him. It's just a cheap effect pertaining to American cinema's understanding of introducing a monster or weird character. I also get the idea of shaking things up and having Ryuk as an asshole rather than a sidekick, but I feel that's just moving from one wrong extreme to the next. There were layers upon layers into Ryuk's alien, neutral-stanced, yet humanised character. Netflix's Ryuk is just... "cackling asshole". Ech.

Look, I obviously don't mean to imply that I wanted or expected 37 episodes of mindgames, procedurals and slow-burning developments to be crammed into a 90-minute adaptation. There's a clear cartoon side of Death Note that does not need to be reflected in a live-action version, but there are also very potent themes and delectable stand offs between its iconic characters that I would have liked to get at least a whiff of in here as well. Did any of the "confrontations" between L and Light feel exciting? The one in the bar, at least, ended up giving me a headache.

I think all the "right things", the "vibes gotten right" from the movie can be mostly attributed to being taken from the anime source itself. Take the "had the movie come out first" idea and, as a standalone movie, this Death Note would have nearly no plausible, well-paced character development for anyone. L least of all. All his right, slick detective moves are borrowed directly from the anime - no standalone creative effort from the moviemakers there - while the rest is superficial and, in the end, he also mentally caves at the first sign of great stress (which is furthermore developed based on / fueled by a completely NONsensical premise of Watari being compromisable via the Death Note). Is that a more human characterisation than an anime-avatar one? Sure. But it's wrong, since in this instance, it doesn't stand for who or what L should represent. L in this movie is the very definition of adaptation by pandering to the memetic traits that stem from a well-known source. "Have him squat on a chair a bit, munch candy, talk about how sleep is overrated, hold a paper by the tip of fingers, mumble and twerk with his lips aaaaaand that's a wrap. Great job everybody, coffee break!" There's nothing that feels natural about this adaptation of L.

Finally, I'd like to disagree with your final supposition on anime vs movie because A) let's be real, there are less notable instances of anime adaptations of cult live action products, while the other way around, you have an movie industry beyond gluttonous for such pandering take-overs and B) had these two products come out in reverse order, but with the same content and quality in them, the anime would still be a deep(er), thoughtfully made show, making me doubt it would have been shot down simply because "oh mah god, it's nothing alike the movie, reeeeeee-".

Is it wrong for this movie to have gone for a "moody kids fool around as demi-gods of death, while chased by a weird-ass edgy (if sloppy at times) detective" approach? Of course not. It's why I didn't say it was a "travesty" in its treatment of the source. Still, doesn't mean I like it.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#167

Post by Ricochet » Sat Aug 26, 2017 12:09 pm

Well, while at it, I might as well write an update on my last sequence of viewings (sometime after returning from Amsterdam, two weeks ago, till present day), which was mostly... ech, rough.

A (10)/A- (9) / B+ (8) / B (7) / B- (6) / C (5) / D (3-4) / F (1-2) / No rating

War Machine (link) - also of Netflix distribution, something apparently timed as "we haven't had another war satire in a while", although it sure ain't no Dr. Strangelove. It adaptes the nonfiction book The Operators and fictionalizes the activities of former US Army General, ISAF and Afghanistan Forces Commander Stanley McChrystal; Brad Pitt portrays his film version, as a competent General, strong willed and dedicated to taking more decisive steps in gathering more troops and securing victory in the conflict, while also getting carried away by his resolute vision and having his patience tested by the bureaucratic strings necessary to be pulled to gain allied support or wishy-washy stances of other officials. Or... something in that vein. Anyway, problem is the movie is kind of a two-hour uneven slug and whatever satirical effect it aimed for (apart from more or less veiled anti-war criticism and stab at McChrystal's missteps and undoing), it felt neither witty or smirk-inducing enough. Pitt carries the movie with some mimic- and discourse-virtuous acting, while most of the ensemble cast is completely non-descript, save for maybe Ben Kingsley playing a buffoon of an Afghan leader and Tilda Swinton doing a German accent as a meddling reporter. I don't see why this subject couldn't have been approached via a more straightforward documentary, but that's how it is. Entertaining, this was not.

Wiener-Dog (link) - something that must have landed on someone's end-of-year lists, otherwise there'd be no real explanation why I picked this up. Don't remember having watched any of this director's - Todd Solondz - previous stuff, either. The simplest way to summarize it is also the easiest way to make it sound utterly silly, as it's basically about a dachshund ending up with various owners, which establishes the frame for a cycle of vignettes around different people with different woes. The overall tone of the movie is a blend of dark or absurd comedy, indie and mumblecore, dysfunctional drama, stuff that may seem taken at times from a Wes Anderson or Coens' scrapbook, yet I kinda cringed at the whole thing. If you haven't seen Danny DeVito in a while (in movies at least), I guess it may be worth briefly seeing him as a mopey disillusioned writer, but the rest of the ensemble cast (Julie Delpy, Greta Gerwig, Kieran Culkin) has been more frequent on screen and this isn't significant stuff from any of them.

Bad Boy Bubby (link) - what proved the most testing thing to sit through, however, was this Rolf de Heer movie, something I had prepared for my Amsterdam trip but never found the time to watch - I was familiar already with his way more delightful Ten Canoes aboriginal docu-film or docu-drama. This one, however, concerns a 35-year-old manchild, confined by his mother all his life in a small, filthy apartment until circumstances make it that he finally steps outside and, even more audaciously, despite his social inexperience and mentally unstable character, somehow connects with the people he meets and converts them to be in sync with his theatrics. Anyway, while the movie deliberately experimented with the sound design (everything manipulated to seem like it's from the perspective of what the main character is hearing) and switching between dozens of director of photography styles to reference the kaleidoscopic, hectic outside world the character encounters, it's still drenched in so black, scabrous and unpalatable of a humor, visuals and storytelling, it's hard to defend even in the name of ugly aestheticism. I asked a Dutch friend why I found de Heer's movie so atrocious and he simply replied "because it's Dutch".

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (link) - *sigh*... well, they tried at least, I guess? or did they? Thing is, my most prevalent feeling after watching this was that, in a clear attempt to cash in on the first movie's wild, smart success, they tried to stay smart and not botch a sequel out of this recipe - and yet they kinda botched it, anyway, as it feels like an overdose on everything: the quipkino, the mindless galactic adventures, the jukebox cues, the spacenova visuals, the tension-less bulletproof superpowers of the characters. What they did strive and somewhat achieved to do was finding some pace and disposition to outline more character development (it's at least what every critic has been praising, so who am I to disagree) - though even here it's uneven, it's mostly about Starlord or Rocket or Yondu stealing the show at times - while toning down the same Marvellian variation on a "save the world/galaxy" situation and flimsy, unmemorable antagonists (who in turn become either comic relief or aid in a main character's further development). Still, it felt like a cheesy exaggeration of the first movie's swag. The plot could have filled the length of a Star Trek episodic adventure rather than another capekino bucket-of-money-making chapter. I laughed or chuckled zero times. All the Guardians felt like growing into a caricature of themselves.

Keetje (Katie) Tippel (link) - a more agreeable Dutch movie this time, also something prepared for my Amsterdam trip but never watched during it, one of Paul Verhoeven's early movies, though slightly flourishing the touches of explicit, loose style and sleazy drama he'd fully affirm himself with later on (RoboCop, Starship Troopers, Showgirls, Black Book, last year's Elle). The story follows a young woman, relocating to Amsterdam with her poverty-stricken family, after which she's tempted into everything ranging from doing manual labor, prostitution, being the concubine of artists and climbing the social ladder towards couture bourgeoisie. As stated, there's room for some Verhoevean drops of explicit, libertine content, but the overall style is nevertheless solid enough to make for an enjoyable, soapy, syrupy 70s melodrama.

Death Note (link) - and lastly, whether you've read the stuff above in spoilers or not, I'll recap that this, for me, proved an insubstantial and hardly worthwhile adaptation of a cult manga/anime, pinning down some of the original's iconic lore and elements (resorting moreover to cues rather than working with them), while not bothering too much with the deeper ethical and moral themes. There is visual gore that may satisfy the way watching a supercut of Final Destination death scenes might, yet there is little development that sticks and isn't superficial and the story turns into half-nonsensical, painful chaos halfway through. It's a sloppy, low on quality result to validate the pursuit to adapt Death Note into an American version of mope, teenage edge and playing God.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#168

Post by Ricochet » Fri Sep 01, 2017 10:32 am

Wrapped up my August with both a few revisits and a couple new movies

A (10)/A- (9) / B+ (8) / B (7) / B- (6) / C (5) / D (3-4) / F (1-2) / No rating

Wanted to give both Kaili Blues and Notes on Blindness the viewing they deserved, after I had flimsily watched and reviewed them here a while ago. Given this debut of his, Chinese director Bi Gan should be worth keeping an eye out, even if, as I've said the first time, he's moving thus far within an arthouse, rural-picturesque, minimalist range rather than anything more plot-heavy or exciting. The most I got, for now, was from his skillful aesthetics and technical ambition (a 30-minute-plus one-shot sequence choreographing several characters travelling by bike, car or boat at various times or intermingling on labyrinthine streets) and the touch of poetic storytelling. Didn't get much more out of Notes on Blindness than the first time, but again, if you want to see something that could have been a straightforward slideshow & interview documetary, yet was instead beautifully stylised and crafted with voice acting, or in the mood for something meditative and profound given theologian John Hull's musings on his condition and life, then you should give this a try.

Also wanted to enjoy Jarmusch's Paterson one more time - and it's definitely going in the shelves and staying up there as one of my faves from last year.

On to the new, two movies provided bizarre, if mostly rewarding experiences (unlike the last batch of Dutch-libertine bawdiness or indie edginess...)

Picked up Raw (link) as a fairly hyped French horror film from last year. The trailer and the IMDb page seem to go subtle on what the main ingredient of horror here is, but plenty other sites, uhm, sink right into it (pun intended), so not sure how one can avoid not being spoiled in this aspect prior to seeing it (as was my case). The thinnest possible synopsis is that it's about a young student following in her parents' and sister's footsteps by going at vet school; the entire family is established as strictly vegetarian, but then the initial phase of the school's crazy, campy, frat-like initiation rituals push the protagonist past her limits, (spoiler)
Spoiler: show
discovering her craving for meat that goes as far as turning her predatorily cannibalistic.
This being a French movie, viewers should probably know what they're getting into in terms of shock value and wild cinematic fantasy, as the movie nonchalantly hits no breaks on its doses of gore and debauchery, the protagonist both seemingly corrupted by and willfully losing herself into crazed behaviour. There are also thick enough undertones on themes of coming-of-age, self-discovery, social inclusion, sisterhood and such, that add value past the queasiness. There are a few spots of predictability, nevertheless with some decent twists and quick stuns along the way. I'd be lying if I'd say this wasn't entertaining: there's a slick, Refn-esque style to the visuals and a giallo tinge to an uninvasive yet loud when it matters score, plus the story and tension ramped up very well without tipping over.

Also, To the Bone (link), an equally discomforting topical movie, this time on the opposite extreme - eating disorders. For me, it felt a bit weird to get back into this subject, after just having read this year a book by Sofi Oksanen that mostly builds on such a theme, but at least with the little knowledge I have following this, I'd imagine this movie did hit some right notes on depicting the struggles with such disorders, therapies and their limitations when it all boils down to the battle with your self, stigmas and social or parental difficulties and so on. There's a sense of honest research put into the depiction, plus of transposing personal experiences, coming both from the director, Marti Noxon (formerly a writer and producer on shows such as Buffy or Glee) and the main actress, Lily Collins - doing her most significant role to date as far as I can recall, at times so focused and hard to fathom she went this deep into her role, especially considering her own prior experiences. Anyway, while the subject and the considerate treatment of it make the most impression, I couldn't help feeling the movie, in its style, is nonetheless fairly lightweight. Maybe there's something to the Netflix recipe that makes them pick up bold subjects, but either crank them up to eleventy stupid (Ojka, Death Note) or play it safe. Past the acting, the thematic hard facts and the unsettling tensity of the story, there was nothing too transformative, transcendent, which is a shame.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#169

Post by G-Man » Fri Sep 01, 2017 12:39 pm

Hidden Figures- It was good but felt like it was playing it safe.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#170

Post by Ricochet » Sun Sep 17, 2017 3:29 am

So I know it's cheesy RIP-ing, at least to my standards - plus, one can certainly go way deeper into Harry Dean Stanton's filmography - but I've rewatched Paris, Texas yesterday (third time, which is already special territory for me) and I'll be bumping it to a full 10. No clue why I had it at 9 thus far, the open space cinematography and color scheme is superb, the acting is contained and great (save perhaps for Aurore Clement's English that never manages to connect me to a veritable character), the opening and closing 30 minutes mirror each other in having me hooked on, watching every detail, every gesture, every word (if any, that is), the story is so simple, yet unfolds in a way that feels more epic.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#171

Post by G-Man » Mon Sep 18, 2017 7:40 pm

Wayne's World

Party time? Yes.

Excellent? Not exactly.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#172

Post by insertnamehere » Mon Oct 09, 2017 3:11 pm

how bout that blade runner, eh?

i ranked it 4/5 stars, but still think it's merely the fourth best Denis Villeneuve film
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#173

Post by DharmaHelper » Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:45 pm

Baby Driver 5/5
War for the Planet of the Apes 3-4/5
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#174

Post by DharmaHelper » Wed Oct 11, 2017 12:15 am

Baby Driver as a matter of fact might be my second (very close second) favorite film of all time. My favorite certainly in terms of cinematography, editing, soundtrack, etc.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#175

Post by Ricochet » Wed Oct 11, 2017 9:59 am

What's your favorite film of all time?

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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#176

Post by G-Man » Wed Oct 11, 2017 1:22 pm

I don't have a true favorite anymore. I have given six films my highest possible rating and I could watch any of them again, though not with obsessive regularity.

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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#177

Post by insertnamehere » Wed Oct 11, 2017 1:58 pm

I have a hastily assembled top four movies on Letterboxd made up of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, F For Fake, Barton Fink, and L'avventura.

===

Very much so, and I've really appreciated your regular movie ramblings. Somehow, the small island of Nauru has more access to the latest Cannes contenders than where I live, so I like using your posts to try and figure out what's worth watching for myself, whenever I can get around to seeing them, of course. Screw G-Man's negativity, I'm here for whatever pretentious film talk you want to lay down.

Still not willing to watch Satantango. I have principles, y'know.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#178

Post by G-Man » Wed Oct 11, 2017 3:53 pm

I've watched every single one of Rico's SAW reviews, so I don't mind hearing his musings but I take movies more seriously than music. I want to avoid getting in a flame war with a fellow film snob. #KeepThePeace
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#179

Post by Ricochet » Wed Oct 11, 2017 5:01 pm

I'm glad my question to Dharma invited answers from other people not Dharma.
What's F for Fake? :o

lol @ Gman. We don't have to fight it out. Just take it with a grain (or, if you want, a box in my case) of salt, much like you'd watch or read any other vlogger / YT reviewer / newspaper article / gossip commenter.

Plus, you've said you hardly manage to watch a movie on an occasion, so I don't think you'll be in tune with 90% of my updates. :p
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#180

Post by DharmaHelper » Wed Oct 11, 2017 5:31 pm

Ricochet wrote:
Wed Oct 11, 2017 9:59 am
What's your favorite film of all time?

===

Preemptive question: would the readers (assuming there are any) of my usual ramblings here be interested in listening 10 minutes to me speak about movies or, as before, in 10 minutes of reading my scribblings - assuming, again, that you'd normally spend any such amount of time on this. In light of some minor tech upgrades in my shed, I could switch to audio (but not full video, the way I'm doing SAWs - that's beyond exhausting).
My favorite film of all time is Hook.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#181

Post by insertnamehere » Wed Oct 11, 2017 5:39 pm

i think we should just do the logical thing and lock Ricochet and G-Man in a thunderdome, watch them fight to the death, and the winner gets to have their movie opinions be the objectively right ones.

F For Fake is an Orson Welles quasi-documentary about art forgery that turns into giddy postmodern fuckery, which is something I have a taste for. *casts sideways glance at the copy of Infinite Jest sitting on his desk*
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#182

Post by Ricochet » Wed Oct 11, 2017 5:48 pm

DharmaHelper wrote:
Wed Oct 11, 2017 5:31 pm
Ricochet wrote:
Wed Oct 11, 2017 9:59 am
What's your favorite film of all time?

===

Preemptive question: would the readers (assuming there are any) of my usual ramblings here be interested in listening 10 minutes to me speak about movies or, as before, in 10 minutes of reading my scribblings - assuming, again, that you'd normally spend any such amount of time on this. In light of some minor tech upgrades in my shed, I could switch to audio (but not full video, the way I'm doing SAWs - that's beyond exhausting).
My favorite film of all time is Hook.
For realz, tho
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#183

Post by DharmaHelper » Wed Oct 11, 2017 5:51 pm

I think my favorite movie of all time is Hook and my favorite film of all time is Baby Driver. I love Hook because of Peter Pan, Robin Williams, the time in my life that I saw the movie and all that gushy stuff.

I like Baby Driver on a more technical, official level. Seriously if you haven't seen it the fucking editing and music and all that shit is so next level.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#184

Post by Ricochet » Fri Oct 13, 2017 9:23 am

Speaking of Cannes, it's time for a new edition of hot screenings, next weekend. They're doing a much ampler "Les films de Cannes" in the capital, yet we'll also be blessed with three days and seven movies. Thankfully, I won't have to sit in the Philharmonic hall until six in the morning this time.

I'll be seeing the 2016 Palme d'Or, the Grand Prix, Haneke's Happy End, the Safdie Brothers' Good Time and, should I truly wish to rewatch, Jarmusch's Paterson, which was one of my faves from last year. :noble:

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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#185

Post by nutella » Sun Oct 15, 2017 2:25 am

DharmaHelper wrote:
Wed Oct 11, 2017 5:51 pm

I like Baby Driver on a more technical, official level. Seriously if you haven't seen it the fucking editing and music and all that shit is so next level.
Just watched it and yeah, it was pretty fun. Very enjoyable and definitely lots of really cool stuff they did with sound synchronization etc. Wouldn't say it totally blew me away as much as it apparently did to you, I could name plenty of other films with just as impressive or more impressive cinematographic flourishes. But it totally made me want to do cool shit in time with music, lol.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#186

Post by DharmaHelper » Mon Oct 16, 2017 3:56 pm

I guess I just usually watch shit movies :P
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#187

Post by Ricochet » Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:22 am

Decided to stick to this format, after all. Too much of a hassle to record myself and I'm supposed to have less free time for such things - *cough* phdhell *cough*.

A (10)/A- (9) / B+ (8) / B (7) / B- (6) / C (5) / D (3-4) / F (1-2) / No rating

Wonder Woman (link) - surprised director Patti Jenkins hasn't done any other feature film in between this one and Monster (with that Oscar-grabbing performance from Charlize Theron), alllll the way back in 2003; she only directed a few TV series' episodes instead. Anyway, this serves as a pre-Justice League standalone origin story, going back to Wonder Woman's (Gal Gadot) childhood on the island of... whatever, revealing what makes her so demi-godly powerful and all that, plus building a sort of power fantasy around her aiding a British intelligence spy, played by Chris Pine, and thus getting involved in defeating some baddies during the Great War, or as we know it now, World War I.

To cut to the chase, it pains me to say that, with all its relevancy - not only counting as a first female lead superhero movie, but also a first DCU movie not to suck - I still found it incredibly boring and by-the-numbers altogether, even for capemovies' standards. There was not an ounce of filmmaking or writing to strike me as special, original - or, to put it another way, not tailored for the masses. The visual palette was either brightened for some paradisiac island scenes or set on dusky for the war scenes - most likely a marketable move, to take the DCU franchise out of the murky hellhole of Batman v Superman or the spasmodic joke that was Suicide Squad; it's more than decent and adequate, but nothing else. More strong female actresses (Connie Nielsen, Robin Wright) are brought in, yet then wasted on screen time and script. Elena Ayana's villainess role takes a backseat to, well, more of the same forgettable (male) villains (the war was lead by generals and freaks, after all). Its first, expository act was crafted about as poorly as it can be imagined, in a cram-it-all-in-there style, and the final fight arc breaks all illusion of superior quality by deploying all the FX chaos and maddening pyrotechny Man of Steel or BvS thsemvles had. Plus the DCU style of action coreography continues to irk me to no end, cutting in between punches to WW flinging her hair back, smirking, throwing a line, doing something else in slo-mo. By all means, no different than Marvel's halt action to deliver quips and punchlines MO, still it feels like a bloody video game. All this leaves a mid act in which the chemistry and banter between Gadot and Pine was praised, as was a sort of "fish out of water" trope of humour and coated jab at women's place in past societies, yet the former was just regular quips and the latter was one "oh wow WW discovers male chauvinism, who would have thunk it" scene after the next.

Again, this was beyond decent compared to anything DCU-related thus far and I get it the world was in need of a fun fantasy of emancipation, but the end result still felt to me head-numbing and banal.

I myself have finally seen Baby Driver (link) and it was pree fun. What I have yet to see is anything else by Edgar Wright, besides Scott Pilgrim, which at least evolved throughout time from a "I hate this adaptation so much" to "I'm still hissy at it overall" - yet even it had that glimmer of Wright's ingenuity to do something creative, or at least flashy and gimmicky. Which at least happens here as well, in a movie that could have otherwise be plainly tagged #heist, #hipster and #mixtape. It's the story of me, constantly listening to music on the streets and trying to match it with daily activities, except for the part where I'm not a mad-skilled driver, involved (or hired) in criminal activities, nor do I have auditory issues - or a cute girlfriend... But for real, it like takes most of Drive's concept (the silentious skilled protagonist, the ramp up in shit-going-wrong action style), drops the batshitness from it, and add instead teen romance, thug banter and two gigabytes of musical cues, all walking a fine line between diegetic and non-diegetic, used in sync with the situation, action and pacing in the movie (with the gimmick that our hero does that on purpose). The director and cast didn't even tiptoe around the fact that most of the scenes were shot to intentionally fit the soundtrack. I'm both cheerful and fearful to report that Focus' Hocus Pocus is used in a grand way. The selection is half pleb, half hipster, half decent, it's really up to anyone's tastes - just like the movie itself might prove, either candy bait or something fun to make your day. What I will say is that the pacing is particularly on point, the performances are sharp, the story is delectable even if with a healthy injection of belief suspension, much zaniness towards its end and a rather corny finale. There was talk that the romance / teen chemistry in the plot doesn't hold water, but I was actually fine with it. There was even more talk about Jamie Foxx hamming it hard, yet I also found him doing this thing and just that. Anyway, exciting personal, whimsical if also head-on gimmicky experiment from Wright and I'd rate this as super enjoyable above anything else.

A Ghost Story (link) - a movie with Sundance rave this year, that extended into being a sweet spot for many critics thus far; a light, twee concept from David Lowery (Pete's Dragon), starring Rooney Mara and Casey Affleck (recast by Lowery from a previous film of his, Ain't Them Bodies Saints), that I haven't seen) as a couple whose home seems disturbed by an unseen presence. Horror simple premise thus far, except what it turns into - without revealing any other major context - is an actual story told from the POV of a ghostly presence... complete with using a "traditional" bedsheet representation of said presence. This could invite hilarity, yet the stakes set are emotional and meditational with a very delicate directorial hand. The whole movie is shot in academic ratio, with the corners bent a bit to make it seem like a slideshow or something and there are slow takes up to and including a one shot of eating half of a pie that would make new wave minimalists fawn, visuals are soft and pastoral and then ghost design took some careful manipulation, from what I've read. It kinda spells out big-lettered messages on themes such as loss, grief, yearning, coping, remembrance, represented from intimate to time-traversing broad. Its final stretch almost had some "holy what" turns, but then it's wrapped up with such a bow tie, that it almost makes sense and pays off. It didn't have me hooked on all the time, yet as far as indie artsy curios go this year, this might be on the right lane.

First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers (link) - a biographical story, directed by Angelina Jolie, inspired by Cambodian activist Loung Ung's memoir on her family and life being torn apart by the coming of the Khmer Rouge regime and her time spent in labor camps - literally the killing fields. Shot and told mostly from the reflections and perspective of her 7-year-old self, there is material to be empathetic towards, the depiction of blind propaganda and regime enforcement can be bone-chilling at times and it doesn't shy away from some gritty depictions, yet with an emphasis put more on sentimental depiction rather than documentary distance, there are limitation to Jolie's style.

Roight... with that out of the way, let's touch upon you-know-which-movie.

I rewatched Blade Runner (link) a day ahead of the main event, like the nerd that I am - The Final Cut, I should specify (and thank god I didn't mindlessly picked the theatrical version, with Ford's killjoy voiceover - though this one still retains that headscratching unicorn insert, but hey, #Ridley-is-pretty-dumb-nowadays-anyway). I remember having openly disliked this one the first time - yet I don't have it written down on my logs, which date back to 2012, so I must have been even younger, hence stupider; I certainly recall having openly disliked Vangelis' OST in context of his entire discography (and I still maintain it's not too much of a big deal, overall). But y'kno, this time around, I enjoyed most of it. I still have the urge to describe some set pieces as... "uninteresting" - and that's despite understanding what they goe for. I probably like most of all the flow of it, every scene feels fat free and serving its purpose; the movie is two hours, yet gets down to business almost right away and feels like it's wrapped up in an hour. The visuals and production design are obviously cinematic bookmarks, although even here I feel most of those shots only had an "establishing shot" quality; I can totally see how it influenced something like Ghost in the Shell's cityscapes, but I don't feel out of breath seeing them here. I can see its worthy elements that make it cult and deep, although one has to wonder how fortuitously Scott ended up creating them - plus its ultimate, most popular riddle is something for which "let the mystery be" is the only right answer. Sorry, Scott, but you're an ass for having tried to push things in a particular direction.

Now, Blade Runner 2049 (link) was taken over by Denis Villeneuve, a director who artistically earned a carte blanche with anything he's done thus far, even as he visibly moved towards the Hollywoodian commercial epicentrum (Incendies, Enemy, Sicario, Arrival - eff Prisoners, tho) - although Ridley Scott retained producer rights and sometimes you can almost sense his presence, especially knowing how [poorly] invested he's been lately in blowing up his own cult standalone movies into mythology-jacked sequels or prequels. Cells. For better or worse, there is both stuff that is recognizably Villeneuve's vision and stuff that inadvertedly links back to the source movie, whether in tributary or plain sequel fashion, and stuff demanded by its blockbuster / action format. Interlinked. For better or worse, there is a grandiose approach taken in this movie, from the technically modernized aspects to everything set in motion to push a story of old and new forward. Cells. If the original could be described as succintly as "neon noir in pissing rain with a subtle existential thematic core", this new one is in no way minimal anything, transporting you from the same-old-rainy LA to other dusky, toxic, wintery landscapes, all seemingly fitted in their own globe, plus picking that existential core to weave further synapses out of it. Cells. Without actually spoiling anything, it can be safely said this movie is has neo-neon-noir, cyber romance, tech and existential dystopia with a Chosen-One / Great-Things-Destined narrative, all in the same bowl. Interlinked.

I went to see this movie in theaters twice, which is quite a rare thing in my practice, but I feel I did it for the sake of more clarity rather than anything else. Cells. There are things in it that work (and many such things, in fact), but also things I came out of internally battling with how I felt about them. Cells. It is done with a superior sense of vision, skill, detail (Villeneuve, Roger Deakins - I mean, com'on), with a patience and pace uncommon to contemporary demands and standards - for which the movie will no doubt tank, because of how putridly low and spectacle-avid the world has set the bar for its blockbusters these days - but I also won't be the person to say that it is perfect in every way. Cells. It can earn its right to be called a superior sequel - especially in, again, this hellish climate of sequels and reboots and remakes - but it doesn't entirely purify its sequel code from specific nostalgic-driven or throwback-oriented traits. Cells. Blade Runner was, either consciously or unknowingly, influential to a lot of other movies, set on their own path. Cells. Art is rightly influential when it pushes new artists to create something themselves out of an idea they're influenced by, not just try to achieve a similar with that idea. Cells. Modern popular cinema has gone far too deep into sequel- and remake-mania. Cells. And while Villeneuve is unquestionably smarter than the average bear, Blade Runner 2049 is not profoundly something new and it has that drive not to trascend its source material, but to get interlinked with it. Interlinked. Within cells interlinked. Within cells interlinked. Within cells interlinked.

While I don't consider that I'll be using anything but minor hints and cues from the movie, I'll nevertheless honor the rule and put the following few more thoughts under the spoiler tab.
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So one of the things I'm grappling with are stuff that walk a very fine line between being at odds with and understanding what Villeneuve went for. This is easily his first film with questionable pacing and amount of material thrown in. It felt better with a second viewing, but the first time around, I became at times borderline panicked with how slow and long things took place. Stuff like "walking from point A to B", for christ's sake. Thing is, he's done slow and meticulous before (set pieces in Sicario come to mind), but also managed to have some tense or emotional value to them. I understand he may have tried to equate it with the slow rhythms from the original movie, but honestly, there was drag in these 163 minutes. I heard Adam from YMS state in his review that he felt the movie lasted an hour and that is incomprehensible to me.

The narrative going for that Chosen One and choosing to have Deckard and Rachael resurface as pivotal characters in a Grander Scheme of Things is obviously a perilous path to take; I thought the detective side of searching for answers supported enough of the story and its twists were as decent as they could have been conceived, but I don't feel there's much else to note. This rejuvenated sequel direction of the script was not the greatest aspect of them all.

I felt some of the set pieces were too vignette-like - I personally feel the cyber-love stuff could have been trimmed. I understand any underlying theme in it - on humanizing characters in spite of their humanity or non-humanity, of what is real and not in connections - but it went too back and forth with all its stuff.

I won't go into overpraise with the acting. In fact, I almost feel this was Villeneuve's weakest signature in focusing on the cast ticking the best way - though there was no doubt a solid grip and good results, overall. Gosling was given a character to fully fit his precariously dry style. Ford was clearly given some incentive to give more of a crap in this role-reprising instance - though, at the same time, he also pulled a meme-worthy "show up in grandpa t-shirt" routine. I enjoyed Sylvia Hoeks' spiel, though at times it bordered into over-confident hokey (like that "nuke" sequence) and I don't feel I understood entirely where her zealotry in accomplishing her mission stemmed from; again, the clues are in there, at various times, making her "feel" something with powerful conviction, but I just don't know if its presentation was convincing. And Leto... *sigh*... he's thankfully not used much and I un-der-stand why a character such as Wallace would take over the reins and develop some sort of hollier-than-thou creator complex, but I feel Leto was given some pretty garbage, be-vague-and-hyperbolic-in-anything-you-utter lines; during the first viewing, I literally thought I was tripping from the nachos.

The music was pretty good; some choices of silence were even better. Would have been interested in what Johansson could have created, had he not dropped out; I attribute some of the more WHAAAA moments to Zimmer's indefatigably loud tastes, but I think it's good he wasn't all alone in this. The visuals were supreme candy, but while I'm in no mood to jump on the 10/10 wagon just for this cinematic aspect alone, there were ideas of visual ambiguity and "clair-obscurity" that were beyond fascinating.

To end with entirely positive remarks, the intro scene for me was excellent, the final fight scene was shot in such a (hopefully mostly practical!) design that I still have goosebumps remembering it. Plus, I personally found a scene between Gosling and a minor character played by Carla Juri to be exquisite in dialogue and atmosphere, save perhaps for a certain reaction from the former towards the end.

To give this movie a B- (6) would be an asshole move from me, considering how many things in it are done right, so a tentative B (7) for now, with no certainty if or when I may upgrade it to B+ (8). Third watch's the charm?
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#188

Post by Ricochet » Thu Oct 19, 2017 7:10 pm

Dropping a few more until I dive into my Cannes screenings' weekend overdose. Although, ugh, I think I've spent this whole week writing about goddamn movies and TV.

A (10)/A- (9) / B+ (8) / B (7) / B- (6) / C (5) / D (3-4) / F (1-2) / No rating

Killer of Sheep (link) - one of two older movies (see following one as the second) that I picked up as African American Cinema recommendations on The New Yorker FB Movie Group by the publication's chief critic Richard Brody. A 1978 obscure one directed by Charles Burnett, with a pocket-sized budget, that even failed to get released back then because it couldn't pay royalties for a quite insane number of songs used. It's been described as non-narrative and structureless, whilst stylistically likened to neo-realism, as it solemnly presents scattered and bluesy moments from the life of a working man, dealing with his dissatisfaction, woes and pains of being at work, at home, in his collective and all that. It's the kind that takes a mood to be in no particular mood to see it, still it has some degree of verité, loose and intimate filming.

Nothing But a Man (link) - an earlier movie this one, from 1964; not directed by an African American, but Michael Roemer took apparently inspiration not only from experiencing persecution himself in Germany and the Southern States as a Jew, but also from spending extensive research time within black communities. Has a more traditional storyline, but still packs a pretty tense and potent drama (although I'm chuckling a bit at giving such a verdict, considering I was in an imperfect disposition that led me to dose off a bit during some of its fragments). May also seem relevant in historical context of those years of rights and racial emancipation.

Spider-Man: Homecoming (link) - well I ain't gonna rant about a second capemovie twice in a week. The main ideas it tries to act smart with include scrapping a lot of the usual origin story melodrama, grounding the action from its "save the world" usual sternness (even the villain-of-the-movie having a decent backstory that merely makes him an anti-Avengers vigilante at best) and partying hard with its "schoolboy x superhero" thematic. Out of everything scheduled in between the previous and upcoming garguantuan and hyper-pretentious Avengers chapters, this is likely to remain the one that takes itself the least seriously - including Spidey acting his age and being on actual path of discovery, instead of an established, accomplished caper who just has to face some new obstacles. Alas, its Marvelian moviemaking signature is reaching beyond peak "flatitude" and a lot of it felt like one "gotta solve smth / fight smb, but also make it in time for chem class" scene after the next. I also cannot even express how little I care about this redeeming the Spiderman series and such (the first Reimi was the only good one, anyway... *runs*). I put this on precisely to simply have something on screen and in that regard it was an exemplary background movie.

Panic in the Needle Park (link) - ill-fated romance during the hazy days and in the heart of New York's drug dealing and needle sticking quartier between junkies played with feral range by Al Pacino and Kitty Winn (awarded as Best Actress at Cannes for this). The drama unfolds with all the fleeting highs and severe lows one can expect, plus with a veridic vibe that could have equally spun out of Burroughs's novels, quickies by Fante or the Beat writers or Patti Smith's memoirs. The performances are mercurial (especially with Pacino at the beginning of his imposing, blustery methods), with a whole repertoire from street-smart adrenaline to vegetative tripping. Really the kind of movie that goes on and on (especially considering its two-hour running time), without any real resolution, its characters just stuck spinning in circles in their addiction and misery.

The Beguiled (link) - technically a Cannes movie, since it saw Sofia Coppola making a return, incite critical attention once more and get a Best Director award in the process. Her latest counts as a remake of Don Siegel's 1971 movie starring Clint Eastwood, if not an actual reinterpretation, since if the original is considered (have not seen it [yet]) a crossbreed of Peckinpah pulp, gothic drama and mysogynistic undertones, Coppola reformulates the story in her own tactful, tiffany ways, turning it to eleventy feminist. Nothing surprising in this, since at least four of her movies focus on girl power, with just two others dealing with deeper human interactions (LiT) or utter detachment from (Somewhere). Not without its own controversy, Coppola apparently removed (and thus whitewashed, considering the cast) a slave girl from the original story, to which reading her rebuttal was either totally confusing or a bit befuddling. Anyway, basic synopsis still frames this as a period piece back in the Civil War, when a wounded Union soldier is sheltered at an all-women boarding school, which destabilizes their inner sanctum as well as their emotional grip. From what I understand, Coppola dispels much of the manipulative and exploitative tone of the original source, prefering gallantry and shades of duplicity in the dialogues and minute character developments. This has screened in my capital's Cannesfest and I've already read a couple of local minds dissing it as yet another shallow exercise from Coppola - and while the visuals are all in pristine shape (the sound design even going as far as to have outdoor ambiental sounds - such as crickets - constantly in the back of your ear) and the performances show control, restraint and tenuity, one could also wonder if Coppola hasn't encassed it all into a mere globe of a fantasy piece. Personally, not ready to say how great of a movie this is or not, but I can honestly say it was one after a very long time that didn't wholly feel like her fooling around and wasting her talent. It invites a great amount of interpretation, for sure, as to the extent of what she accomplishes or does right here.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#189

Post by DharmaHelper » Fri Oct 20, 2017 9:29 pm

1. Its Themyscira

2. Homecoming was better than Raimi 1.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#190

Post by speedchuck » Fri Oct 20, 2017 9:59 pm

DharmaHelper wrote:
Fri Oct 20, 2017 9:29 pm
2. Homecoming was better than Raimi 1.
Easily.

But was it better than Raimi 2?

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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

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Post by DharmaHelper » Fri Oct 20, 2017 11:25 pm

Its been a while since I've seen the Raimi Spider-Men, but probably.
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

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Post by insertnamehere » Sat Oct 21, 2017 12:03 am

if Spiderman Homecoming was entirely about Hannibal Burress' gym teacher character, it would have been the best superhero movie ever made
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Re: Rate the last movie you've seen

#193

Post by Ricochet » Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:04 am

Ah. I always try to remember that island's name as The Mascara.
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